all about veronica robles
Founder of Boston's First All Female Mariachi
Book Now
veronica robles

Veronica Robles is a Mariachi singer by trade, but has become a cultural icon for Latinos in Boston. She has effectively utilized the power of arts and culture to bring the community together by raising awareness on the importance of diversity and she has empowered youth by employing them and teaching them about their roots and culture.

Robles is Co-founder and Director of the Veronica Robles Cultural Center, a non-profit organization that supports community action and economic growth in East Boston, offering Latin American arts and culture programs while also providing jobs for youth.

Veronica Robles continued to influence the community in the aspect of arts. In June of 2016, the Opinion section of the Boston Globe published an article about “The Changing Faces of Greater Boston”. This is where she represented the new Boston together with her assembled Boston’s first-ever-all-female Mariachi band.

In 2019 Ms. Robles received the Ohtli Award. This Award is one of the highest and very limited distinctions given by the Government of Mexico. The award consists of a medal, a silver rosette, and a diploma. This acknowledgment honors people who have dedicated most of their lives and careers to “blazing a trail” abroad for younger generations of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans as they strive to achieve their dreams. Ohtli is a Nahuatl word that means “pathway”, or camino in Spanish.

Recently Veronica was selected as a Neighborhood Salon Luminary for the 2019-20 season with the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and was part of Concert for One presented by Celebrity Series of Boston and named Person of the Year for Saugus by Essex Media!

From 2002 through 2014 Veronica co-produced and hosted a popular Television show entitled “Orale con Veronica” broadcast over 20 cities in the New England region and on Telemundo Boston. In 1996 She co-hosted the television shows “Noches de Palenque” produced by Television Azteca and broadcast nationally in Mexico.

Veronica credits her grandmother who was affectionately called by every one “Mama Coco”, she would spend hours in her kitchen as she prepared delicious dishes and making flower bouquets while singing old songs from Mexico.

After becoming a widow and to help make ends meet to raise her 12 children, “Mama Coco” started a small business making and selling flower bouquets and flower centerpieces in a restaurant at the famous Plaza Garibaldi—the cradle of Mariachi music in the historic center of Mexico City where you can find mariachi bands for hire at all times.

Robles is Co-founder and Director of the Veronica Robles Cultural Center, a non-profit organization that supports community action and economic growth in East Boston, offering Latin American arts and culture programs while also providing jobs for youth.

Veronica Robles continued to influence the community in the aspect of arts. In June of 2016, the Opinion section of the Boston Globe published an article about “The Changing Faces of Greater Boston”. This is where she represented the new Boston together with her assembled Boston’s first-ever-all-female Mariachi band.

“I learned the craft of Mariachi music from veteran musicians when I was a teenager. My grandmother, Mama Coco introduced me to a mariachi group led by an elder Mariachi musician known as “El Chiquis”. I began working with his group when I was just 14 years old. I enjoyed singing and learning hundreds of songs, music styles and the ways they should be played and sang according to the tradition.

I had the opportunity to travel to many towns within Mexico to sing at traditional fiestas to celebrate local saints and virgins. I would sing at the church during the mass and afterwards at the fiesta organized by the community. During those trips I was able to learn and understand the rich diversity of my beautiful country. I learned the way they spoke, their values, customs and music. I had the opportunity to sing with other traditional groups such as jarochos, bandas and trios just to mention a few, which led me to have an appreciation for mariachi’s place within the larger context of traditional Mexican music.”

Veronica Robles

Veronica Robles is a woman of courage and principles. As a cancer survivor, she lives her life to the fullest, filled with joy, passion, and love. Her work honors the memory of her only daughter Kithizia who passed away as a teenager. She was a beautiful dancer and loved her culture. She also learned to love and celebrate the cultures of other countries.

To cope with the immense pain and sadness that haunts her every day, Robles and her husband decided to open Veronica Robles Cultural Center (VROCC) a non profit organization in East Boston to teach the values of love and respect. Life is priceless and material things have no value compared to these.

“Let’s take advantage of the blessing of having a place where we can pass on our traditions to children and youth around dance, singing, food, art and to show the beauty of Latin American countries, but most importantly let’s promote respect, raise awareness for diversity, spread love, inspire peace and create beautiful and collective memories that will last a lifetime.” said, Veronica Robles

Veronica Robles is a Mariachi singer by trade, but has become a cultural icon for Latinos in Boston. She has effectively utilized the power of arts and culture to bring the community together by raising awareness on the importance of diversity and she has empowered youth by employing them and teaching them about their roots and culture.

Robles is Co-founder and Director of the Veronica Robles Cultural Center, a non-profit organization that supports

community action and economic growth in East Boston, offering Latin American arts and culture programs while also providing jobs for youth.

Veronica Robles continued to influence the community in the aspect of arts. In June of 2016, the Opinion section of the Boston Globe published an article about “The Changing Faces of Greater Boston”. This is where she represented the new Boston together with her assembled Boston’s first-ever-all-female Mariachi band.

In 2019 Ms. Robles received the Ohtli Award. This Award is one of the highest and very limited distinctions given by the Government of Mexico. The award consists of a medal, a silver rosette, and a diploma. This acknowledgment honors people who have dedicated most of their lives and careers to “blazing a trail” abroad for younger generations of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans as they strive to achieve their dreams. Ohtli is a Nahuatl word that means “pathway”, or camino in Spanish.

Recently Veronica was selected as a Neighborhood Salon Luminary for the 2019-20 season with the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and was part of Concert for One presented by Celebrity Series of Boston and named Person of the Year for Saugus by Essex Media!

From 2002 through 2014 Veronica co- produced and hosted a popular Television show entitled “Orale con Veronica” broadcast over 20 cities in the New England region and on Telemundo Boston. In 1996 She co-hosted the television shows “Noches de Palenque” produced by Television Azteca and broadcast nationally in Mexico.

Veronica credits her grandmother who was affectionately called by every one “Mama Coco”, she would spend hours in her kitchen as she prepared delicious dishes and making flower bouquets while singing old songs from Mexico.

After becoming a widow and to help make ends meet to raise her 12 children, “Mama Coco” started a small business making and selling flower bouquets and flower centerpieces in a restaurant at the famous Plaza Garibaldi—the cradle of Mariachi music in the historic center of Mexico City where you can find mariachi bands for hire at all times.

Robles is Co-founder and Director of the Veronica Robles Cultural Center, a non-profit organization that supports community action and economic growth in East Boston, offering Latin American arts and culture programs while also providing jobs for youth.

Veronica Robles continued to influence the community in the aspect of arts. In June of 2016, the Opinion section of the Boston Globe published an article about “The Changing Faces of Greater Boston”. This is where she represented the new Boston together with her assembled Boston’s first-ever-all-female Mariachi band.

“I learned the craft of Mariachi music from veteran musicians when I was a teenager. My grandmother, Mama Coco introduced me to a mariachi group led by an elder Mariachi musician known as “El Chiquis”. I began working with his group when I was just 14 years old. I enjoyed singing and learning hundreds of songs, music styles and the ways they should be played and sang according to the tradition.

I had the opportunity to travel to many towns within Mexico to sing at traditional fiestas to celebrate local saints and virgins. I would sing at the church during the mass and afterwards at the fiesta organized by the community. During those trips I was able to learn and understand the rich diversity of my beautiful country. I learned the way they spoke, their values, customs and music. I had the opportunity to sing with other traditional groups such as jarochos, bandas and trios just to mention a few, which led me to have an appreciation for mariachi’s place within the larger context of traditional Mexican music.”

Veronica Robles

Veronica Robles is a woman of courage and principles. As a cancer survivor, she lives her life to the fullest, filled with joy, passion, and love. Her work honors the memory of her only daughter Kithizia who passed away as a teenager. She was a beautiful dancer and loved her culture. She also learned to love and celebrate the cultures of other countries.

To cope with the immense pain and sadness that haunts her every day, Robles and her husband decided to open Veronica Robles Cultural Center (VROCC) a non profit organization in East Boston to teach the values of love and respect. Life is priceless and material things have no value compared to these.

“Let’s take advantage of the blessing of having a place where we can pass on our traditions to children and youth around dance, singing, food, art and to show the beauty of Latin American countries, but most importantly let’s promote respect, raise awareness for diversity, spread love, inspire peace and create beautiful and collective memories that will last a lifetime.” said, Veronica Robles

About
WILLY LOPEZ

Willy Lopez is a sound engineer, music and video producer, specializing in Latin American music with a comprehensive career in television, music and performing arts productions. He has worked in marketing for over 50 years. He is also a talented songwriter.

Currently Mr. Lopez is the President of LTV Productions Corp., Co-founder and President of Veronica Robles Cultural Center a non profit organization that supports community action and economic growth in East Boston and offers Latin American arts and culture programs.

Mr. Lopez is currently leading a project to build a branch of Veronica Robles Cultural Center in Guamuchil a small community in Oaxaca and that was affected by the 2018 earthquake in Mexico.

About
WILLY LOPEZ

Willy Lopez is a sound engineer, music and video producer, specializing in Latin American music with a comprehensive career in television, music and performing arts productions. He has worked in marketing for over 50 years. He is also a talented songwriter.

Currently Mr. Lopez is the President of LTV Productions Corp., Co-founder and President of Veronica Robles Cultural Center a non profit organization that supports community action and economic growth in East Boston and offers Latin American arts and culture programs.

Mr. Lopez is currently leading a project to build a branch of Veronica Robles Cultural Center in Guamuchil a small community in Oaxaca and that was affected by the 2018 earthquake in Mexico.
There are many ways you can support this cause
Volunteer your time on one event or project or serving on the board. For more information send an email at or call at 781-558-5102.
Photo Credits

Blue Mariachi Outfit by Darlene Devita

Diversity photo with Frederick Law
Olmsted impersonator Gerry Wright
by Maddu Huacuja Link

Jalisco Pink dress by Robert Torres

Scroll to Top